f r
_

Field of Flowers

Hi All,

The other day a friend asked me to take some photos of her daughters, one aged 3 years and the other 8 months.

I had been driving around the local countryside the previous day and I spotted a field full of yellow flowers with an old stone well in the middle. I knew this would be a fantastic setting not to be missed!

As we arrived at the location the clouds rolled in. This made conditions difficult. One moment the sun would be out the next it would be cloudy. I was using my Canon 550ex with Yongnuo 602 radio trigger mounted on a cheap light stand that I bought from Amazon a while back.

The flash was set to manual at 1/4 power. The camera was iso 100 ~ 70-200 2.8 lens @ long end ~ f5-f6.3 ~ shutter speed 1/160 sec

 

All I did was position the light stand at an angle in front of the girls so that it would be filling in the shadows caused by the sun, then I walked a few meters away from them and shot away. Any fine tuning of the position of the flash was made by the girl’s mother who was standing just out of range of the photo.

The key to these images was 3 fold:

  1. Crouching in the flowers gave me a low angle and created some out of focus parts of the image which gave some of the pictures a dreamy effect
  2. The sun was behind the girls, so it acted as a rim light whilst the flash was filling in the shadows from the front. If I had positioned the girls the other way round looking into the sun they would be squinting.
  3. No soft box or any other modifier was used, the fill light was from a bare flash! Usually you get hard shadows from direct flash but in this case the flash was a fair distance away from the girls and it was set to a relatively low power and balanced to match the ambient light. In the final 2 photo’s it looks like the girl is lit by the setting sun. In fact that’s the light from the flash (with a CTO gel). The weak sunlight is creating a slight out line around the girl from the other side. This acts to separate the subject from the background

«
 
»

Share

Twitter Facebook Del.icio.us Digg LinkedIn StumbleUpon

Reply